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အာဏာရွင္စနစ္ က်ဆံုးမွ တတိုင္းျပည္လံုး စစ္မွန္တဲ့ ဒီမိုကေရစီကို ခံစားရမယ္

Burma: Cyclone picture (11)

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A monk walks past homes damaged by last month’s cyclone, in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

A woman shares her food with cats in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. Nyaung Wai village’s temple, as well as the Buddhist monastery and the nunnery all suffered great damage when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

A man walks into a damaged temple in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. The village’s temple, as well as the Buddhist monastery and the nunnery all suffered great damage when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Two Buddhist nuns walk past their damaged shrine in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. The roof and the back wall of the nunnery’s meditation and prayer building was totally destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals gather in front of a damaged monastery in Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals wait in the rain for food donations to arrive from aid workers, on a road leading to Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals wait for food donations to arrive from aid workers on a road leading to Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Survivors of Cyclone Nargis queue to receive relief supplies from an aid agency in the hardest-hit Irrawaddy delta region of Myanmar in this picture taken June 5, 2008. (Stringer/Reuters)

Buddhist novices recycle bricks from a building that was damaged by Cyclone Nargis in the town of Dedaye in the Irrawaddy Delta, on June 9, 2008. Myanmar insisted Wednesday that visas were being granted to aid workers and no food shortages were imminent in an apparent bid to deflect criticism that it has not done enough after Cyclone Nargis. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

Survivors are seen in a village that was hit by Cyclone Nargis in the town of Dedaye in the Irrawaddy Delta, on June 9, 2008. Myanmar insisted Wednesday that visas were being granted to aid workers and no food shortages were imminent in an apparent bid to deflect criticism that it has not done enough after Cyclone Nargis. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

The damage sustained by a village after being hit by Cyclone Nargis, is seen on June 10, 2008 in Heingyigyun town in the Irrawaddy Delta. Southeast Asian and UN experts will have full access to cyclone-devastated parts of Myanmar, where more than a million people have still not received any foreign help, ASEAN said Thursday. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

A cyclone survivor waiting for rice in Kungyangon, 30 miles south of Yangon. New guidelines adopted by Myanmar’s ruling generals are further delaying emergency efforts to deliver aid to regions ravaged by the cyclone, human rights experts said (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

A shelter in the Irrawaddy Delta, some 400 kms from Yangon. New guidelines adopted by Myanmar’s ruling generals are further delaying emergency efforts to deliver aid to regions ravaged by the cyclone, human rights experts said. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

Cyclone Nargis’s path took it through some of Burma’s poorest regions, where thatched-roofed homes, often made of bamboo, were no match for the cyclone’s deadly winds. Residents of affected areas have been left to fend for themselves by an unresponsive government — often spending what little money they may have available for farm supplies on building materials instead.

Homes made largely of bamboo and other lightweight materials — occupied by Burma’s poorest people — were easily destroyed by Cyclone Nargis, which blew them away or swept them out to sea. More than 2 million Burmese left homeless by the catastrophe have received no help from their government.

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 10:38 am

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