Save Burma

အာဏာရွင္စနစ္ က်ဆံုးမွ တတိုင္းျပည္လံုး စစ္မွန္တဲ့ ဒီမိုကေရစီကို ခံစားရမယ္

Archive for June 13th, 2008

After the storm in Burma

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destroyed home in Burma
Cyclone Nargis’s path took it through some of Burma’s poorest regions, where thatched-roofed homes, often made of bamboo, were no match for the cyclone’s deadly winds. Residents of affected areas have been left to fend for themselves by an unresponsive government — often spending what little money they may have available for farm supplies on building materials instead.

After the storm in Burma

Landing in Rangoon in the wake of Cyclone Nargis, the Human Rights Center’s Eric Stover witnessed the impacts firsthand — and now warns of a ‘second wave’

– As faculty director of Berkeley’s Human Rights Center, Eric Stover makes a career of flying into the teeth of tragedy, tirelessly investigating and documenting the effects of war, repression, and poverty in global hotspots as diverse as Bosnia, Cambodia, Rwanda, and Iraq.

When Cyclone Nargis struck Burma’s Irrawaddy Delta on May 2, Stover was already en route to Rangoon to observe the vote on a government-sponsored constitutional referendum. He arrived the day after the cyclone hit. During his two weeks in the country — as international aid workers and foreign journalists alike were denied entry or forced to leave — he saw the impacts not only of the cyclone itself, which killed an estimated 134,000 people and left 2.4 million others without shelter, but the ways in which 45 years of military rule are exacerbating the crisis.

This wasn’t the first time Stover, an adjunct professor of law and public health, has visited Burma — also known as Myanmar, the name preferred by the ruling junta. As co-author of a 2007 report, The Gathering Storm: Infectious Diseases and Human Rights in Burma (PDF), he had documented the absence of any real health-care infrastructure in the reclusive nation — some 40 percent of its budget goes to support a standing army of more than 400,000, the second-largest in Southeast Asia — and the enormous obstacles confronting those attempting to provide humanitarian assistance to its 47 million people.

devastation in Burma
Homes made largely of bamboo and other lightweight materials — occupied by Burma’s poorest people — were easily destroyed by Cyclone Nargis, which blew them away or swept them out to sea. More than 2 million Burmese left homeless by the catastrophe have received no help from their government.

Even United Nations representatives have seemed reluctant to criticize the government’s pitiful (some would say pitiless) response to the tragedy. Stover is among the relatively few foreigners who not only witnessed the immediate devastation firsthand but is willing to speak openly about the ongoing dangers spawned by Burma’s repressive political climate.

“This is a country where you have very poor ability to respond to any kind of emergency, let alone the public health of its citizens,” Stover says. “When the cyclone hit over the evening on the 2nd and 3rd of May, there was not adequate warning given to people in the delta, or in Rangoon, or in any of the towns that were struck. There were some announcements made on national television and radio, but it certainly wasn’t adequate timing.”

Had residents of the delta had time to get to higher ground, he suspects, many might have been saved.

“In particular, what strikes you when you see the devastation from the cyclone is the fact that many of the buildings that were made of brick or concrete managed to stay up, and people could have taken refuge there, in monasteries or schools or elsewhere. But what happened, and what often happens in natural disasters, is the poorest people, the most vulnerable people, are affected the most, because they live in thatched huts or structures made out of bamboo, which were swept out to sea or simply blown away.”

Complicating an already dire situation was what Stover calls “a compounding of factors,” including “very poor health status to begin with,” the fact that nongovernmental organizations working inside the country were caught off-guard, and the government’s recalcitrance in issuing visas to foreign crisis experts and aid workers. So highly militarized is the political culture, he explains, that local officials are reluctant to act without the junta’s approval.

“You had a kind of stagnation taking place, a freezing,” he says. “People didn’t know what to do.”

Nearly three weeks after the cyclone hit, U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon met with Burma’s top official, Gen. Than Shwe, about getting help to the millions of people — as many as three-quarters of those affected — believed to have gone without any kind of assistance. “To me, that’s just unprecedented — that a secretary general would have to travel to a country to meet with its leader to plead to have international aid come into the country,” Stover says.

Stover himself managed to make two separate trips about 100 miles south of Rangoon to the delta, taking advantage of “a small window of opportunity” before the government began setting up roadblocks to keep foreigners out of the worst-hit areas.

“What was really incredible, being there and seeing it, was the response of Burmese citizens, the response of local business groups and religious groups and NGOs,” he reports. “Many of them saw that their government was doing nothing, that the international community was stymied, and so they went around and collected donations, and bought rice and dried fish and other supplies in the market and headed into the delta as best they could.”

The aid that has gotten through is “a drop in the bucket” compared with the desperate, widespread need for food and housing, he adds. Even more concerning, perhaps, is what Stover calls “the second wave” — the likelihood that conditions will deteriorate further still for those who managed to survive the cyclone and its immediate aftermath.

“What you see as you drive through is that people’s houses have been demolished, and they’ve quickly made shelters, and they live inside these shelters sometimes with their livestock. The water is rising because the monsoon season has come early, so there’s the possibility of a rise in dengue fever, diarrheal diseases, and, of course, cholera.” The World Health Organization, he notes, estimates that 60 percent of the country’s health-care infrastructure — pathetically inadequate to begin with — has been destroyed.

Add to that the fact that Burmese farmers were preparing for the annual rice planting when Nargis hit, but in many cases are now without oxen to help with the planting or money with which to buy fertilizer, having been forced to spend what little they had on building supplies. Those who were relocated to temporary shelters won’t be able to plant at all, auguring a potential problem for the nation’s economy when November’s harvest arrives.

As in war, Stover says, a major casualty of natural disasters is truth. That applies especially in Burma, where state television aired images that minimized the destruction and instead showed “military officers going out and handing out rice along the roads around Rangoon and declaring that they were on top of it.” What is needed, he believes, is an inquiry into the government’s response to the continuing crisis.

“The secretary general said this is not a time for politics, this is a time to save lives,” observes Stover. “And while that is certainly the case and should be fully supported, everything is political, and at some point we have to look at this through a political lens and try and understand how more international pressure can be placed on the Myanmar government to bring it into the 21st century.”

The referendum, he notes, was anything but free and fair: The draft constitution put forward by the country’s rulers was largely unavailable for review by the voters outside Rangoon, and critics had no real opportunity to voice their opposition — even as citizens were dunned with pro-government messages in newspapers and on TV. The measure passed overwhelmingly with what the government said was a 99 percent turnout — and what Stover facetiously calls “a historical first in any country.”

Yet while he’s sensitive to the struggles of NGOs and activists in a country as repressive as Burma, he insists that truth is a powerful antidote to authoritarianism.

“It may make things more difficult, but we have to get to the bottom of this,” he says. “I think if we ignore it, it only continues the problem. And that’s what’s happened for too long. I mean, the military has been in power since 1962. We need to know what happened.”

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2008/06/12_stover.shtml

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Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 10:43 am

Burma: Cyclone picture (11)

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A monk walks past homes damaged by last month’s cyclone, in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

A woman shares her food with cats in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. Nyaung Wai village’s temple, as well as the Buddhist monastery and the nunnery all suffered great damage when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

A man walks into a damaged temple in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. The village’s temple, as well as the Buddhist monastery and the nunnery all suffered great damage when Cyclone Nargis hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Two Buddhist nuns walk past their damaged shrine in Nyaung Wai village in the township of Kyauktan 49 km (30 miles) south of Yangon, Myanmar, Wednesday, June 11, 2008. The roof and the back wall of the nunnery’s meditation and prayer building was totally destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals gather in front of a damaged monastery in Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals wait in the rain for food donations to arrive from aid workers, on a road leading to Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Locals wait for food donations to arrive from aid workers on a road leading to Laputta, Myanmar, Monday, June 9, 2008. Laputta was destroyed by Cyclone Nargis which hit Myanmar on May 2-3, 2008, leaving some 78,000 people dead and another 56,000 missing, mostly in the country’s southern Irrawaddy delta region. (AP Photo)

Survivors of Cyclone Nargis queue to receive relief supplies from an aid agency in the hardest-hit Irrawaddy delta region of Myanmar in this picture taken June 5, 2008. (Stringer/Reuters)

Buddhist novices recycle bricks from a building that was damaged by Cyclone Nargis in the town of Dedaye in the Irrawaddy Delta, on June 9, 2008. Myanmar insisted Wednesday that visas were being granted to aid workers and no food shortages were imminent in an apparent bid to deflect criticism that it has not done enough after Cyclone Nargis. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

Survivors are seen in a village that was hit by Cyclone Nargis in the town of Dedaye in the Irrawaddy Delta, on June 9, 2008. Myanmar insisted Wednesday that visas were being granted to aid workers and no food shortages were imminent in an apparent bid to deflect criticism that it has not done enough after Cyclone Nargis. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

The damage sustained by a village after being hit by Cyclone Nargis, is seen on June 10, 2008 in Heingyigyun town in the Irrawaddy Delta. Southeast Asian and UN experts will have full access to cyclone-devastated parts of Myanmar, where more than a million people have still not received any foreign help, ASEAN said Thursday. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

A cyclone survivor waiting for rice in Kungyangon, 30 miles south of Yangon. New guidelines adopted by Myanmar’s ruling generals are further delaying emergency efforts to deliver aid to regions ravaged by the cyclone, human rights experts said (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

A shelter in the Irrawaddy Delta, some 400 kms from Yangon. New guidelines adopted by Myanmar’s ruling generals are further delaying emergency efforts to deliver aid to regions ravaged by the cyclone, human rights experts said. (AFP/File/Khin Maung Win)

Cyclone Nargis’s path took it through some of Burma’s poorest regions, where thatched-roofed homes, often made of bamboo, were no match for the cyclone’s deadly winds. Residents of affected areas have been left to fend for themselves by an unresponsive government — often spending what little money they may have available for farm supplies on building materials instead.

Homes made largely of bamboo and other lightweight materials — occupied by Burma’s poorest people — were easily destroyed by Cyclone Nargis, which blew them away or swept them out to sea. More than 2 million Burmese left homeless by the catastrophe have received no help from their government.

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 10:38 am

Report: Junta distributed land soon after Myanmar cyclone

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Friday, June 13, 2008 – Page updated at 12:00 AM

Just seven days after Cyclone Nargis devastated Myanmar last month, the ruling military junta parceled out key sections of the affected…

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Just seven days after Cyclone Nargis devastated Myanmar last month, the ruling military junta parceled out key sections of the affected Irrawaddy Delta to favored tycoons and firms, including some facing sanctions from the U.S. Treasury, according to a Myanmar magazine with close ties to the government.

Some of the most notorious business execs, including Tay Za and Steven Law, also known as Tun Myint Naing, were given control of “reconstruction and relief” in critical townships, under the leadership of top generals.

Treasury identified Tay Za as a “regime henchman” this year when it sanctioned hotel enterprises and other businesses he owns.

All told, more than 30 firms and 30 execs are to divide up the business in 11 townships hit by Nargis, the report said.

The document is dated May 9, a time when the United Nations, aid groups and many countries were trying to reach areas affected by the storm, which killed as many as 130,000 people and left 2.5 million homeless. Despite promises of greater openness, Myanmar’s rulers have continued to impose restrictions on relief, according to reports from the region.

The document, which includes the cellphone numbers of many execs, appeared in the weekly Voice, a journal published by Nay Win Maung. A translation was provided by BIT Team, an India-based group that tries to promote information technology in the xenophobic country.

Nay Win Maung, the son of a military officer, was raised among Myanmar’s military elites, giving him good connections, and his magazines can access government-related news and exclusive information.

“The Treasury is targeting the regime’s cronies, and the regime wants its cronies to get the money,” said Tom Malinowski, Washington advocacy director for Human Rights Watch.

Efforts to reach Law or Myanmar representatives in Washington on Thursday were unsuccessful.

While some of the execs awarded contracts are known to human-rights activists and financial-crime experts, others are less prominent, making the document a possible guide to the individuals now in favor with the junta.

The government estimated it needed more than $11 billion in reconstruction aid shortly after the May 2-3 cyclone hit.

Myanmar, also known as Burma, is rich in natural resources, but much of the country is poor. The junta has enriched itself with natural-gas fields that bring in $2 billion annually, as well as trade in jewels, heroin, amphetamines, timber and small arms.

Some of the conglomerates given business in the delta, such as Law’s Asia World and Tay Za’s Htoo Trading, were also tasked with building the country’s new capital at Naypyidaw, more than 200 miles from the old capital of Yangon. With little notice three years ago, the junta uprooted the capital to a remote area, requiring massive construction of new government buildings, hotels and housing.

Copyright © 2008 The Seattle Times Company

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2004474429_myanmar13.html

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 10:05 am

World focus on Burma (13 June 2008)

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US Cannot be Trusted: Junta
The Irrawaddy News Magazine, Thailand –
In a clear reference to the US, a media mouthpiece for the regime warned that “the goodwill of a big Western nation that wants to help Myanmar [Burma] with …
Australian PM pledges cooperation with Indonesia president
Hemscott, UK –
‘Indonesia has experienced the tsunami, the people of Burma (Myanmar) the terrible impact of the cyclone, the people of western China the earthquake most …
Rotary ShelterBox kits provide emergency shelter
Northumberland Today, Canada –
… well used in emergencies in several parts of the world, and thousands are now on their way to victims of recent disasters in Myanmar (Burma) and China. …
Burmese pilgrims cross the USA
Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, IN –
May Shein still has family in Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. Her sister and two brothers lost their homes in the cyclone, she said. For Min Min Htwe Nge, …
A MIX OF ART, POLITICS AND AID
ic Wales, United Kingdom –
MP for Cardiff North Julie Morgan is to hold an event at Cardiff’s Wales Millennium Centre to show solidarity with protesters in Burma and the victims of …
‘The kids’ pictures of their pain are heart-wrenching’
ic Wales, United Kingdom –
nThe DEC Cymru Myanmar (Burma) Appeal is still open for donation. People can also donate at any post office, high street bank or at British Red Cross, …
Burma junta: US cyclone disaster aid can’t be trusted
USA Today –
Burma, also known as Myanmar, turned down humanitarian aid aboard naval vessels from the United States, as well as Great Britain and France, …
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Irrawaddy News Magazine – By VIOLET CHO Tourism to Burma has slumped following last month’s cyclone, causing airlines to cancel services, holiday hotels to close and travel companies

Burma: Cyclone Fact Sheet #20 (FY) 2008 USAID

Burma: New rules further delay relief HRW

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Grant Full Access to International Community: Laura Bush
The Irrawaddy News Magazine, Thailand –
“We urge Burma’s ruling generals to allow US and other international humanitarian relief teams, as well as non-governmental organizations,
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At Least 11 Die in Gem Town Flooding, Landslides
The Irrawaddy News Magazine, Thailand –
By SAW YAN NAING At least eleven people were killed when floods and landslides hit Burma’s gem center, Mogok, Mandalay Division, this week. …
The Body Shop Expects Sales To Rise To RM100 Mln
Bernama, Malaysia –
The money will be donated to Children on the Edge, a charity working with the Emergency Team-Burma, a coalition of grassroot organisations, …
China’s Geopolitic Imperatives and its Current Economic Position
The Market Oracle, UK –
During World War II, the United States struggled to build the Burma Road to reach Yunnan and supply Chiang Kai-shek’s forces. The effort was so difficult it …
Landslides hit Burma’s ‘Valley of Rubies’
NEWS.com.au, Australia –
The landslides caused some injuries and property damage, but the government mouthpiece New Light of Myanmar newspaper gave no details. …
Report: Junta distributed land soon after Myanmar cyclone
Seattle Times, United States –
Myanmar, also known as Burma, is rich in natural resources, but much of the country is poor. The junta has enriched itself with natural-gas fields that …
The connections and network
Malay Mail, Malaysia –
Myanmar Women and children from Myanmar are trafficked to Thailand, China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Malaysia, South Korea and Macau for commercial …
Burma cyclone fund ‘falling short’
The Press Association –
The United Nations says funding to keep the Burma cyclone relief effort going is falling drastically short of the targets. The Queen, Bill Gates, …
Australian PM pledges cooperation with Indonesia president
AFP –
“Indonesia has experienced the tsunami, the people of Burma (Myanmar) the terrible impact of the cyclone, the people of western China the earthquake most …
UN: Burma Donations Too Little
TIME –
13, 2008 By AP (RANGOON, Burma) — Queen Elizabeth II, Bill Gates, JK Rowling and a clutch of Hollywood stars have all given generously to help Burma’s …

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Malaysia a centre for sex and labour traders
Malay Mail, Malaysia –
“For example, the Malaysian government continues to arrest, detain and deport asylum seekers, refugees and stateless persons from Myanmar. …
Of cyclone victims, Chevron
The Oregonian – OregonLive.com, OR –
… views in order to set up a strawman that anyone is objecting to aid being provided to the victims of Cyclone Nargis in Myanmar (also known as Burma). …
Burma Gives ‘Cronies’ Slice of Storm Relief
Washington Post, United States –
Burma, also known as Myanmar, is rich in natural resources, but much of the country is desperately poor. The junta has enriched itself with natural gas …
Myanmar: Keep doors open for aid – Thakin Thein Pe
ReliefWeb (press release), Switzerland –
The veteran politicians criticized the government saying that the current situation in Burma is worse than the pre-independence era. …
Laura Bush says Myanmar should give full access to aid
PR-Inside.com (Pressemitteilung), Austria – 1
… more than US$35 million (¤22.7 million) in humanitarian assistance for the cyclone» that hit Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, in May, Laura Bush said. …
Blogging the Khalilzad conference call
St. Louis Post-Dispatch, United States –
Asked how he would characterize cooperation by Myanmar’s military junta in efforts to bring relief to the Burmese people, Khalilzad said that the …
Fierce purity and the fate of Myanmar
International Herald Tribune, France –
Yet for nearly two decades, events in Myanmar (formerly Burma) have revolved around the condition, the policies and most of all the victimization of Daw …
Burma has received only 56% of funds: UN
Sydney Morning Herald, Australia –

About 250 experts from the UN, Burma’s government and Southeast Asian nations headed into the Irrawaddy delta on Tuesday for the survey of 6000 hard-hit …

The Trickle Down Iraq Effect: Crisis in Myammar, Sudan, and other …
Black State, DC –
In Burma now known as Myanmar, a military dictatorship has ruled for twenty years has repressed Buddhist monks, who want an end to their repressive rule. …
Does the UN have a future or is it rusty and dead
RussiaToday, Russia –
At the moment they cannot even get into Burma so as to help the Cyclone hit land. If the UN had power? No iraq war would have happened, no Kosovo state …

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After the storm, warnings of a ‘second wave’ in Burma
UC Berkeley

This wasn’t the first time Stover, an adjunct professor of law and public health, has visited Burma — also known as Myanmar, the name preferred by the …

Asian Business Strategy Articles and News from the APMF
Asian Business Strategy, Malaysia –
Aung San Suu Kyi and Burma/Myanmar governance: Aung San Suu Kyi has been placed under ‘protective custody’ by the Burma/Myanmar junta as a series of …
Aung San Suu Kyi
Asian Business Strategy, Malaysia –
The international media has dropped the story for the time-being, and so is business in Burma/Myanmar, as the Burmese ruling junta proves that little has …
Ethiopia: AAAS Geospatial Analysis Confirms Destruction of Towns …
AllAfrica.com, Washington –
In late 2007, AAAS released a report identifying 25 sites throughout eastern Burma (also known as Myanmar) showing significant village destruction, …
Laura Bush Steps into Foreign Policy Spotlight
NPR –
… who criticized her for bringing in foreign policy disputes when she briefed the media after a cyclone tore through Myanmar, also known as Burma, in May. …
On the outside, looking in
The Canberra Times, Australia –
They have just returned from remote villages in the Irrawaddy Delta, the southern tip of Burma devastated by Cyclone Nargis on May 2-3, where they joined a …
Chef Q&A: Sushi Chef Zin Kyaw
Marconews, FL –
Well, I’m from Myanmar, formerly Burma, where Cyclone Nargis did such damage recently. But to get to the point, Myanamar/Burma and Singapore have always had …
Let’s Go! June 13 and beyond
Beaumont Enterprise, tx –
SOUTHERN GOSPEL BURMA-MYANMAR BENEFIT CONCERT, featuring Brian Free and Assurance, 7 pm June 14 at the Jefferson Theater, 345 Fannin St. Advance tickets $12 …
NYC Burmese Population Pleads for Aid
Brooklyn Downtown STAR –
… prayers and fasting in solidarity with the monks back home and the starving cyclone victims of Burma, which is officially known as the Union of Myanmar. …
Burma: New Rules Further Delay Relief
Human Rights Watch (press release) –
(New York, June 12, 2008) – New Burmese government guidelines on humanitarian agencies will further hamper the delivery of aid to the victims of Cyclone …
Multinationals Rev Up Disaster Relief Efforts
KPLC-TV, LA –
After the recent Myanmar cyclone, for example, the ruling junta was reluctant to accept outside help, delaying visas for foreign aid workers and permissions …
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Laura Bush says Myanmar should give full access to aid
PR-Inside.com (Pressemitteilung), Austria –
… more than US$35 million (¤22.7 million) in humanitarian assistance for the cyclone» that hit Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, in May, Mrs. Bush said. …
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Today’s Overview of Leading News & Views – 12 June 2008
Israel Hasbara Committee (subscription), NY –
… recent weather catastrophes that have wiped out rice fields in Myanmar (Burma), or the virulent wheat disease now infecting crops in Iran as well as in …

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 9:48 am

Burma: updated top news (13 June 2008)

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Mirror.co.uk

In Myanmar, a Times reporter worked in secret to cover the story

Los Angeles Times –
One of the boats used by a Los Angeles Times staff writer for an undercover look at conditions in the Irrawaddy River delta is docked at the storm-ravaged village of Pa Dewe Gaw, Myanmar. There, survivors lived in small, leaky shacks pieced together …
UN’s Myanmar appeal only 44 percent funded The Associated Press
Myanmar Cyclone Disaster Appeal Is Only 40% Funded, UN Says Bloomberg
AFPHuman Rights Watch (press release)Toledo BladeABS CBN News
all 1,641 news articles »

Myanmar says US aid can’t be trusted

(AP Photo)

YANGON, Myanmar – As individuals and aid agencies around the world dig into their pockets for funds to help Myanmar’s cyclone victims, the country’s ruling junta said Friday that such assistance from the United States could not be trusted.


BBC News

Fierce purity and the fate of Myanmar

International Herald Tribune –

Yet for nearly two decades, events in Myanmar (formerly Burma) have revolved around the condition, the policies and most of all the victimization of Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, now 62, who has been held under house arrest for 12 of the past 18 years.

RI running out of time to play key role in Myanmar Jakarta Post

Myanmar says detention of democracy leader legal The Associated Press

MerinewsJURISTLabour PartyABC Online

all 364 news articles »


Earthtimes (press release)

UN warns Myanmar funds appeal short of target

The Associated Press –

YANGON, Myanmar (AP) – Queen Elizabeth II, Bill Gates, JK Rowling and a clutch of Hollywood stars have all given generously to help Myanmar’s cyclone victims, but the UN says government donations for its relief effort are falling short.

ASEAN says team to have full access in Myanmar AFP

Myanmar Cyclone Disaster Appeal Is Only 40% Funded, UN Says Bloomberg

Ability Awareness MagazineTODAYonlinePR-Inside.com (Pressemitteilung)The Associated Press

all 1,765 news articles »


Fresh News

UN official says pregnant Myanmar cyclone victims in urgent need …

International Herald Tribune –

AP BANGKOK, Thailand: The cyclone in Myanmar devastated the country’s health sector, leaving as many as 35000 pregnant women in urgent need of proper medical care, a UN family planning expert said.

UN: 35000 pregnant women need care in Myanmar The Associated Press

Burma says no tax taken from aid The Press Association

WBOC TV 16The Associated PressInternational Herald Tribune

all 206 news articles »


CBC.ca

Volunteers send aid through Burma’s (Myanmar’s) back door

Christian Science Monitor – Jun 11, 2008
No, Ms. Finke elected to fly here June 11 to join a grassroots effort for cyclone relief and civil empowerment for Burma (Myanmar), run by the father of her friend who was calling to urge her to come. For most volunteers hoping to help, Burma seems …
In Burma, A Crime for Civil Society to Provide Relief? AlterNet
Burma will not face food-shortage: Junta minister Mizzima.com
USA TodayToronto StarMizzima.comChristian Science Monitor
all 169 news articles »

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

June 13, 2008 at 1:06 am