Save Burma

အာဏာရွင္စနစ္ က်ဆံုးမွ တတိုင္းျပည္လံုး စစ္မွန္တဲ့ ဒီမိုကေရစီကို ခံစားရမယ္

In photos: ‘Burma Cyclone Aftermath May 19th’

leave a comment »

Asia-Pacific Features

In photos: ‘Burma Cyclone Aftermath May 19th’

By M&C News May 19, 2008, 19:33 GMT

A Burmese cyclone survivor carries food as he walk near an uprooted tree at a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor carries food as he walk near an uprooted tree at a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese monks cut uprooted trees at a monastery in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese monks cut uprooted trees at a monastery in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor sit in front of his damaged house in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor sit in front of his damaged house in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor young girl stays inside a monastery at a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor young girl stays inside a monastery at a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese cyclone survivors line up for food during aid distribution by a local donor at a cyclone affected area in Kyauktan, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese cyclone survivors line up for food during aid distribution by a local donor at a cyclone affected area in Kyauktan, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor young boy carries his sister at a monastery in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese cyclone survivor young boy carries his sister at a monastery in a cyclone affected area outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Myanmars Minister for Foreign Affairs U Nyan Win (C) observes a moment of silence for the cyclone victims in Myanmar and the earthquake victims in China before the start of the Special ASEAN Foreign Ministers Meeting at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore on 19 May 2008. The Special ASEAN Foreign Ministers Meeting was convened to discuss how the ASEAN members can assist Myanmar in the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis.  EPA/Norman Ng

Myanmar’s Minister for Foreign Affairs U Nyan Win (C) observes a moment of silence for the cyclone victims in Myanmar and the earthquake victims in China before the start of the Special ASEAN Foreign Ministers Meeting at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore on 19 May 2008. The Special ASEAN Foreign Ministers Meeting was convened to discuss how the ASEAN members can assist Myanmar in the aftermath of Cyclone Nargis. EPA/Norman Ng

Burmese cyclone survivors children play near their shelter at a cyclone affected area in Kyauktan, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese cyclone survivors children play near their shelter at a cyclone affected area in Kyauktan, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese residents pray under the rain during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese residents pray under the rain during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese residents walk under the rain during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese residents walk under the rain during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese woman carries her son after receiving food from local donators on the outskirt of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese woman carries her son after receiving food from local donators on the outskirt of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Two children look at empty water tank as others wait for food on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

Two children look at empty water tank as others wait for food on the outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese nun and residents burn incense during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese nun and residents burn incense during a ceremony to mark the enlightenment of Buddha at Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese woman receives food from local donators on the outskirt of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need.  EPA/EPA PHOTO

A Burmese woman receives food from local donators on the outskirt of Yangon, Myanmar, 19 May 2008. The United Nations said 2.4 million people were still critically short of aid after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, and relief agencies warned that the most vulnerable survivors will start dying soon unless they get the aid they need. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

May 20, 2008 at 12:33 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: