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အာဏာရွင္စနစ္ က်ဆံုးမွ တတိုင္းျပည္လံုး စစ္မွန္တဲ့ ဒီမိုကေရစီကို ခံစားရမယ္

In photos: ‘Burma Cyclone Aftermath – May 16th’

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Asia-Pacific Features

In photos: ‘Burma Cyclone Aftermath – May 16th’

By M&C News May 16, 2008, 16:24 GMT

U.S. military amphibious ship, the USS Essex (LHD2) is seen stationed about 85 nautical miles or 113 km south of Yangon, Myanmar in the International waters of the Andaman Sea on 16 May 2008. The U.S. navy ship is awaiting permission from the Myanmar military to lift and transfer much needed humanitarian relief aid supplies to impoverished country struck by Cyclone Nargis on 3 May. EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

Helicopter pilots from the U.S. Marines with Sea Knights, U.S. marine helicopters parked on the deck of military amphibious ship, the USS Essex (LHD2) stationed which is about 85 nautical miles or 113 km south of Yangon, Myanmar in the International waters of the Andaman Sea on 16 May 2008. The ship has 14 helicopters onboard ready to transfer aid suplies to Myanmar once the U.S. navy ship receive permission from the Military junta to transfer the much needed humanitarian relief materials to the impoverished country struck by Cyclone Nargis on 3 May . EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

U.S. navy sailors and marines pass bags of water for packing into boxes on U.S. military amphibious ship, the USS Essex (LHD2) stationed about 85 nautical miles or 113 km south of Yangon, Myanmar in the International waters of the Andaman Sea on 16 May 2008. The water packs are part of the aid supplies to be transferred to Myanmar once the U.S. navy ship receive permission from the Military junta to transfer the much needed humanitarian relief aid supplies to impoverished country struck by Cyclone Nargis on 3 May . EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG

Burmese young boys have their lunch at a monastery outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
A Burmese monk dries his robe at a monastery in Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
U.S. navy sailors and marines fill up bags with water on U.S. military amphibious ship, the USS Essex (LHD2) stationed about 85 nautical miles or 113 km south of Yangon, Myanmar in the International waters of the Andaman Sea on 16 May 2008. The water packs are part of the aid supplies to be transferred to Myanmar once the U.S. navy ship receive permission from the Military junta to transfer the much needed humanitarian relief aid supplies to impoverished country struck by Cyclone Nargis on 3 May . EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG
A Burmese young monk smiles as he walks near an uprooted tree in Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese cyclone survivors queue for food during a distribution outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese cyclone survivors queue for food during a distribution outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese monks and residents cut an uprooted tree at a monastery in Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Burmese young boys wait for food at a monastery outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese men cut an uprooted tree at a monastery in Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese men cut an uprooted tree near a pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO
Burmese young boys wait for food at a monastery outskirts of Yangon, Myanmar, 16 May 2008. Almost two weeks after the storm tore through the Southern Myanmar, leaving up to 128,000 people dead, supplies of food, medicine and temporary shelter have been sent in dribs and drabs to devastated communities. EPA/EPA PHOTO

Written by Lwin Aung Soe

May 17, 2008 at 4:55 am

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